Spencer

Pablo Larrain’s Spencer, featuring Kristen Stewart as a tormented Princess of Wales on a Christmas holiday with the Royal Family at Sandringham House, is primarily of interest for the star’s transfixing performance as the put-upon noble who would rather be anywhere else than under sovereign…

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Dune

Dune is a gargantuan physical production that builds its worlds, slowly and meticulously, but never offers a reason for us to care.…

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Roy’s World: Barry Gifford’s Chicago

As an excavation of a place, time and a personal history, Roy’s World: Barry Gifford’s Chicago deconstructs Chicago poet and novelist Barry Gifford in an original movie portrait of the artist as a young man, told in a variety of forms, against a backdrop…

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Halloween Kills

As Roger Ebert frequently asserted, the first and most important question to ask of a film is what its makers intended, and the second is how well they executed upon said intentions. This, of course, does not allow for questioning whether what was intended/executed…

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Lamb

The pastoral Icelandic countryside proves a superbly eerie milieu for Vladimir Johansson’s slow-burn arthouse thriller Lamb, one of the strangest, riskiest movies in recent memory.…

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No Time to Die

No Time to Die is a smashing piece of entertainment, a movie so much fun to watch—extravagant in the usual James Bond ways that provide immeasurable movie comfort—and such a generous swan song for star Daniel Craig that you’d have to be a bitterly…

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The Eyes of Tammy Faye

In the opening scene of The Eyes of Tammy Faye, an unrecognizable Jessica Chastain is an early 90s Tammy Faye Bakker, primping before a mirror in preparation for an interview. As she explains, both her lips and eyes are lined with permanent ink, and…

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Blue Bayou

Excellent intentions and important subject matter are toppled by overwrought melodrama in the busy immigration polemic Blue Bayou. It gives one no pleasure to declare that a film so ambitious, timely and good-hearted—about family separation and deportation due to draconian (lack of) immigration policy—plays…

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The Card Counter

The inside of his motel room must be shrouded in pristine white cloth, which he retrieves, impeccably folded, from his suitcase, never overpacked and containing but a handful of neutral, fitted suits. At the nightly poker table he recedes, an enigma with a winning…

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Old

With the latitude of fantastical contexts, the best genre filmmaking examines social and philosophical considerations to deliver salient observations on the human condition. In just American cinema, we might look to 2001: A Space Odyssey, Blade Runner, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Arrival and…

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