Browsing all articles in Films.

Get Out

Get Out 

* * * 1/2 Jordan Peele’s debut feature Get Out is the first terrific commercial movie of 2017, a smart, inventive and consistently surprising social critique disguised as a commercial horror film that both provokes and entertains in equal measures. It’s been nearly fifty years since Stanley Kramer’s Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner examined similar territory, Katherine […]

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Split

Split 

* * * 1/2 M. Night Shyamalan’s Split is a surprisingly thoughtful thriller doling out waves of psychology and shocks, a return to form for the once heralded filmmaker after a string of high-profile misfires. Shyamalan, whose career high came at the beginning with 1999’s The Sixth Sense, has toiled around with lesser fare for […]

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Hacksaw Ridge

Hacksaw Ridge 

* * * 1/2 They don’t make them like they used to, except when they do. Hacksaw Ridge is one of the year’s best-constructed, most passionate movies, a true story of uncommon bravery both on and off the World War II battlefield, one of a conscientious objector who nonetheless enlisted and faced persecution from fellow soldiers […]

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45 Years

45 Years 

* * 1/2 As adult dramas go—and there are so few today it seems out of line not to be generous—45 years, starring Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtney as a longtime married couple whose relationship fissures when the past intervenes, is tasteful, well-acted, sincere and so low-key it feels anemic. Its chief merit is Oscar-nominated […]

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Into the Woods

Into the Woods 

* * * Director Rob Marshall and Disney had high expectations and a bit of skepticism riding on their adaptation of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s beloved 1986 musical Into the Woods, and what initially seemed an unwieldy combination—a fractured trio of fairy tales where love doesn’t conquer all and human weakness and doubt upend […]

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The Disapperance of Eleanor Rigby: Her/Him

The Disapperance of Eleanor Rigby: Her/Him 

**  Her/Him ***1/2  Them Comprised of two distinct features and running 195 minutes, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her/Him is both too much and not enough.  Arriving a mere few weeks after the film’s initial release, a 122-minute version titled Them, the new cut is a sometimes lovely, mostly unwieldy thing, a well-acted, meandering and […]

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Chef

Chef 

* * * 1/2 The very definition of a crowd-pleaser, Jon Favreau’s Chef is as amiable and enjoyable a comedy as in recent memory, and one that ultimately works on sweetness and a solidly charming performance from its writer/director/star, whose film has real heart and big laughs.  Chef Carl Casper (Favreau) is a once-famed guru […]

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Hyde Park on Hudson

* * Bland Hyde Park on the Hudson, about a 1939 weekend sojourn between the FDR, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, doesn’t do much to illuminate Roosevelt and even less to enliven its decidedly slight chapter of history. It wants to be a whimsical comedy but never strikes the proper tone, instead offering a […]

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Silver Linings Playbook

* * * * The Silver Linings Playbook is one of the year’s most emotionally generous movies, a crowd-pleaser of a romantic comedy that also happens to be a gritty family drama about bi-polar disorder. If that sounds like an unlikely combination, writer-director David O. Russell deftly juggles such complexities in a movie that believes […]

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Premium Rush

* * * 1/2 Premium Rush is a dizzying sleeper of a movie about bike messengers in Manhattan trying to deliver a package that everyone seems to want.  It’s a quintessential New York movie, a whirligig action ride featuring fearless couriers who zigzag through traffic uptown, downtown, from the West Side Highway to FDR and […]

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